My Passion Project

When I started blogging it was part of a secret mission.  I know that sounds super cool and top secret, but it’s not.  It’s been a personal mission to find my passion.  I know this may not make sense to everyone reading this but I don’t want to just have a job or have a career.  I want to build something of my own.  I want to be proud of what I do.  I want my children to be proud of what I do.  It’s not enough for me to say I make “x” amount of dollars a year. I want to leave an imprint on this earth.  I want to impact others.  My blogging has forced me to look at myself from a lot of different angles.  And in order for my blog to be authentic, I’ve had to talk about the good, the bad and the ugly!  This has all been part of the master plan (insert weird creepy laugh here).

Over the past several months I’ve been thinking about all the things I wanted to be when I grew up and all of the things I’ve actually done. The first thing I remember wanting to be was a teacher.  I was always playing school with my grandma when I was a kid– she was the student and I was the teacher, obvi.  Over the course of my childhood and through my teenage years, teaching was always on my list.

At some point, I wanted to be a magazine editor (not sure if I ever told anyone about this one).   When I was a kid I used to love reading magazines.  You know, like Bop!  And then I graduated to Fitness and Self and eventually Cosmopolitan (because what 18-year old prude wasn’t reading Cosmo?!)  I did this weird thing when I read magazines– I literally read them from cover to cover.  I used to read EVERYTHING in the magazine. Even the credits in the beginning. Even the name of the Mac lipstick I’d never ever wear. EV-ER-Y-THING.  But my favorite part of the magazine was in the beginning.  It was the note from the editor, alongside a very beautiful picture of what I dreamed every magazine editor looked like.  I used to think to myself, I want to be an editor of a magazineI want to be the one to approve the themes of each edition and “yay” or “nay” the ideas for stories for each section.  (I literally decided exactly what the editor did even though I had nothing to base it off of…but that sounds kinda accurate, right?).

But that dream faded pretty quickly.

Next up: sportscaster (I even went to college for this one!).  Although I still love to play sports and be active, my desire to follow sports has dwindled over the years.  But back when I was 17 or 18 years old, I was a big Mets and Knicks fan.  I would watch SportsCenter on ESPN with my brother every morning before school and I thought it would be so awesome to be the next Linda Cohn.  But that, too, fell by the wayside within my first semester of college.  Obviously that dream wasn’t the dream.

Eventually I fell into (and yes, I use those words purposely) working with my dad.  My dad worked for MetLife for 29 years.  I began working at his office at the end of my second year of college.  I was the Recruiting Coordinator.  I was 20 years old and had no idea what I was doing, but the girl I replaced must’ve really sucked because they didn’t even let her stay to train me.  I did get some training from my direct manager, but she dealt more with marketing so the actual nitty gritty of my job I kinda had to learn on my own by making phone calls and asking a million questions.

Three years later my dad brought me over to his new company, National Life Group.  He needed an Office Manager and thought I’d be a great fit for the small agency.  He was right… I totally nailed it.  Haha, just kidding.  Okay, okay, I didn’t not nail it, but I had a ton to learn.  I was only 23 years old and even though both companies were life insurance companies there was a big difference between my roles at MetLife and National Life.  I was running the office at National Life.  Good thing I was getting my MBA, right?  (Ha, I laugh at that only because when it comes to running a business there is nothing better than on the job experience.  You can take all the classes in the world but it will never beat out work experience.)

There are parts of my job I love.  For instance, every day is different.  And, I get to work on all aspects of the business—accounting, financial reporting, marketing, training, recruiting and on-boarding, even a little IT stuff.  I’ve grown A LOT since day one.  I’m not sure I’d be where I am today if I hadn’t been given this opportunity at a very young age.  And I am grateful for the autonomy and flexibility I have.  Even though I don’t own the business, I run the business.  And I take that very seriously (like 98.5% of the time).

So why am I giving you my job history?  Relax, I’m getting there!

I have done quite a few things over the years—barista at Starbucks, Recruiting Coordinator and New Business Processor (at MetLife), Beachbody coach, pure barre instructor, Operations Manager (National Life) and blogging.  And I am truly grateful for everything I’ve done because a) I’ve had the balls to go outside my comfort zone and try new things and b) I’ve learned a lot about myself from each one!

I’ve learned where my strengths are.  I’ve learned where my weaknesses are (brings back memories of my business school days when we talked about SWOT analysis).  I drilled down and figured out what I liked about each of those jobs/opportunities and what I didn’t like.  Here’s a list of the things I love:

  • I love to talk (I know… SHOCKER)
  • I love to listen
  • I love to help people
  • I love to lead small groups and work one-on-one with people
  • I love running a business
  • I love writing and editing
  • I love fitness
  • I love to problem solve
  • I love goal setting
  • I love sharing my experiences
  • I love providing motivation and inspiration to others

It took me 14 years of being in the workforce (18 years old- 32 years old) to figure out what my actual dream job is but I finally figured it out!  I’m in the preliminary stages of my endeavor.  Meaning, I’m researching and doing a shit ton of homework.  But let’s just say it involves ALL of the things I love to do.  For now, I’m calling it my passion project.  But eventually, because I’m going to work real hard at it and be real good at it (don’t believe me, just watch), it’s going to be my baby.  The job that will allow me to create the lifestyle I want to live.  I’m not ready to officially announce anything because I know people will ask me a ton of questions that I just don’t have answers to yet.  So hold your horses! It’s coming!

And while I’m working on MY DREAM, I really encourage everyone reading this to step outside their comfort zone and try new things.  Even if those things aren’t the dream, it’ll at least take you one step closer to it.  And don’t be afraid to put yourself out there and actually own your dream.  Because guess what?  You’d be surprised how many people are actually cheering you on versus tearing you down. I’ve never EVER gotten any negative feedback from any one of my blog posts.  In fact, people are encouraging and supportive and rooting for me!  So why wouldn’t people do the same for you!!?!?  They would!! Trust me!  🙂

Making Movement Part of Mom Life

Being a parent is literally the most difficult job I’ve ever had.  There’s always four little eyes watching my every move and four little ears listening to my every word.  It’s a big responsibility and no one truly understands it until they’re actually in it.  It becomes much more apparent when your kids start asking questions or repeating things you say.  You’re no longer free to stare at yourself in the mirror and make comments about your body while your daughter is slipping her feet into your shoes so she can play dress up.  You can no longer hide the candy or the “mommy juice” (aka diet soda in my house) because your son has become very curious and will ask “what’s that?” a million times before you throw a Twizzler at him to try.

Well, I guess you can do those things.  You can do anything you want.  But I think every parent wants to set a good example for their kids.  And don’t get me wrong, we all make mistakes and say unflattering things about ourselves, partake in eat-out-of-the-carton ice cream sessions, and scream or yell at our kids out of frustration.  And that’s all OK because no one is perfect.  We’re all just doing the best we can.

I’m going to take a step back here for a second.  You ever say something and before you actually finish the sentence all you can think is I sound like mother/father?  It happens to me ALL THE TIME!  Some classic lines in my house growing up were because I said so and life’s not fair.   Those are just things I remember my parent saying, but what about things my parents did or behavioral habits they had??

When I thought about this, the first thing that popped into my head was making my bed every dang morning.  As a child I watched my mom make her bed every day.  I was taught to make my bed.  And now, as an adult, I will not leave my house without making my bed.  It’s just part of my life.  It’s part of my routine.  It’s part of my lifestyle.  I watched this habit, I was taught this habit and this habit became a habit of mine (remember, habits are not always a bad thing!).

Creating and teaching healthy habits to my kids is very important to me.  My goal is for my kids to see me engaging in as many positive, balanced and healthy activities as possible.  Positive self-talk is one.  Eating a well-balanced diet that includes everything in moderation and never feeling guilty about indulging is another.  And of course, my most favorite thing in the world to talk about—movement.

The word movement is all encompassing to me. It means parking a little further away from the store because you have two good legs and you should use them.  It also means not sitting on the couch every day from the minute you get home to the minute you’re ready to transition to your bed.  It’s about having a dance party with your kids instead of watching TV.  Or running around outside while cleaning up the yard instead of playing on a tablet (two birds, one stone here people!).  And it also means getting your heart rate up and strengthening and lengthening your muscles with various forms of exercising.

I want my kids to witness and partake in all of the above. I want movement to be a big part of their lives.  I want it to be a non-negotiable.  I want it to become part of who they are are and what they do.  I want it to be part of their lifestyle.

And while I won’t know if what I’m about to share is actually working until later on down the road (I’ll keep you posted by writing a blog post about it in 20 years), it couldn’t hurt to try some of these ideas.

Make time instead of making excuses.  I could probably write a 30-page dissertation on how I hate when people say they don’t have time.  No, you have time, you’re just not making time.  Instead you’re making excuses.  If something is that important to you, you find a way to get it done.  I try not to use the phrase “I don’t have time.”  Instead I say: “it’s just not the highest priority right now.”  Because if it was higher on the list, it would be getting done. Yes, it’s that simple. No, for real, it’s that simple.

If you want to be healthier, more fit, more balanced, more in control, have more energy… then MAKE IT A PRIORITY!  You might have to adjust your sleep schedule slightly or limit your social media scrolling time.  Unfortunately there are only so many hours in a day so you just need to allocate your time better because no one has time.  No one ever complains they have too much time.  We all just say there’s not enough time in the day… or do we just need be honest with ourselves about how we’re utilizing our 24 hours?

Workout while the kids are sleeping: I commend any mother that works out with her kids playing in the next room. I think that’s amazing. I prefer peace, quiet and not having to worry about how many times I’m going to have to pause to break up a fight or “oooh” and “ahhh” over artwork.

When I workout at home, I set my alarm as early as 4:40 AM so I can get my workout in before the morning mayhem begins. I know it sounds super early and maybe too early to some, but your body gets used to waking up early. It’s worth it to get your 30-minute workout done in 30 minutes rather than 45 or 50 because of all the stop and go.  Plus, I’m a working mom so I don’t have much choice– there’s no opportunity for a nap time workout.  And by the time I get home, well I’m lucky if I can keep my eyes open past 8 PM.

Get your kids involved in exercising: However, there are times that I snooze my alarm on a Saturday morning. And I do that knowing that at least one of the kids will be waking up during my workout. It’s usually Ethan and he comes downstairs and sits and watches me.  But really he doesn’t STFU for 30 minutes!!

So while I regret hitting snooze because my workout won’t be as good as I want it to be, I figure it’s a good opportunity to teach Ethan about my love of movement. He imitates me using his Styrofoam weights, uses my step to attempt some cool moves, and works on his plank hug grip while I work on my plank. It’s cute and I love it.

Playground + Walk: I absolutely love being outdoors with my kids anytime it’s over 50 degrees. Every time we go to the “big park” in my neighborhood, I make it a point to remind them in the car: first we take a walk and then we play on the slides.

That’s right, the minute we get to the park I pop the kids in the double stroller and we walk around the park twice before playing.  I like this tactic for two reasons: 1) It’s an opportunity for movement FOR ME! And 2) it teaches my kids patience. They don’t always get to run to the swings the minute they see them.  And now it’s just part of the routine of going to the park.  It’s not like it happens every other time we go.  That means I don’t have to play “let’s make a deal” on the days I want to go for a walk. (I save that for when we leave: Ethan, Alex, do you want ice cream?!) #notajoke

And last, but definitely not least, schedule your workouts into your week on Sunday evenings.  Not like I think I’m going to barre Monday and Wednesday and I’ll run, like two days.  No, like, write it down in your planner and check it off as you complete the workout.

You might not have to write down your workout schedule forever, but I’ll be honest, over a decade into my wellness journey and I still find it useful to write it out.  In a way I kinda build the rest of my week around my workouts.  What I eat, when I socialize, when I have a drink (or two).  It helps keep you honest and who doesn’t like checking something off a list!?!?

None of these tactics are that sophisticated.  I prefer to keep things simple.  My kids are going to develop some of my habits (good and bad).  My goal is to give them as many good ones to latch onto as possible!

Food Philosophy 101

When someone says the word “diet” most of us automatically think of the secondary definition of diet—a special course of food to which one restricts oneself, either to lose weight or for medical reasons.  But today I’m talking about the primary definition, the kinds of food that a person habitually eats.  When I think of the statement “I’m going on a diet” the words that come to mind are restrictive, difficult, stressful, bland, boring, etc.

Don’t these statements sound much better?

“I’m working on improving my diet” OR  “I’m changing my diet to get more in line with my overall health goals.”

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I know I’ve mentioned this before, but I do not have a degree in nutrition.  I’ve done a good amount of research.  I’ve experimented with many different lifestyles (always for a short period of time because none of them are sustainable for me).  I’ve put in the work. Through all that I’ve come up with the three principles of my food philosophy:

  1. Eat as many of your calories as possible. Powders, vitamins, bars should be used as supplements (when necessary), not as your meal.  Eat real food!
  2. Nothing should be off limits—you can eat everything in moderation. Don’t be a no carb girl… nobody wants to go to an Italian restaurant with you.
  3. Eat in line with your goals.

Let’s dig into each one!

Eating Your Calories

I’ve gone through phases where I’ve had two shakes, two bars and a couple of small snacks per day and guess what?  I was starving (surprise, surprise, right?!).  During that phase I learned that eating as many of my calories as possible is not only physically more satisfying for me, but it’s mentally more satisfying too.  Sitting down and chewing on food takes waaaaaay longer than drinking a shake.  Your body has time to enjoy the eating process.  You chew, you enjoy the flavors, you swallow, you (should) take a second and breathe and then go back for another bite.  Eating becomes more of an event rather than “let me guzzle this shake so I can hustle to my next appointment/class/meeting” moment.

Plus I just think that it’s hard to get all the different vitamins and minerals you need from powders, shakes, bars, and pills.  That’s why they should be used as supplements, when appropriate, but not as a replacement for real food, ya hear?!

I currently use a pre-workout powder and one scoop of protein powder per day.  Snacks include carrots and hummus, string cheese and almonds, Greek yogurt, hard-boiled eggs, and fruit. I eat real food for lunch and dinner. I don’t take any vitamin or other supplement pills.

Everything in Moderation

I’m a big believer that if you like something, you should be able to enjoy eating it—in moderation.  I enjoy candy and ice cream.  And I can and do enjoy both of those things. The goal is to try to enjoy both of them in moderation (which I’m pretty good at with ice cream) but in the “needs improvement” category for candy.  But I’m better than I used to be so some progress is better than no progress! 😝

I’ve tried to cut out candy completely and all it’s done is make me want it more.  I know that sounds familiar to everyone reading this because it’s a common theme in dieting.  Restrict the bad foods until you cave and eat ALL THE BAD FOODS.  And you start and stop the cycle like a billion times until you either recognize you should be able to have that food in moderation and find a way to do that OR you forget trying to make healthier habits and continue down the same path you’ve been on. Most of us end up doing the latter.

I believe in well-balanced meals that include proteins, fats and yes, CARBOHYDRATES!  I secretly cringe when someone tells me they cut all fruits out of their diet because of the high sugar/carb content. Or they only eat 30g of carbs per day because they’re on a strict keto diet.  I only offer my opinion if it’s asked but I know, from trying so many different diets, that none of them are truly sustainable for the rest of your life.

Eat carbs—mostly good carbs.  But also free feel to indulge in the not-so-nutritious carbs every once in a while.  Going on severe diets is not only physically draining but constantly thinking about it makes it mentally exhausting, as well.

Eating In Line With Your Goals

I am not going to tell you not to focus on the number on the scale or losing a certain amount of pounds because I’ve been there before.  I know what it’s like to want to see a number. I get it. And I had to go through that phase before I moved onto the phase I’m in now which is really trying to fill my diet with healthy and nutritious food.  But just keep in mind as you’re going through the process, the end goal should be to improve your overall health.  The immediate goal might be to lose “x” amount of pounds so whatever you do to reach that goal should be things that are sustainable changes for the end result of living a healthier and more energized life.  Make sense?

Instead of focusing on what you want to achieve (i.e. lose 10 lbs or have a six pack), ask yourself this question:

What am I willing to change/improve in my diet and what results will it yield?

The idea here is to consider what you’re actually willing to do.  It goes back to the idea of wanting to want something but not actually wanting it enough to do anything about it.  So think about what you’re actually willing to change, improve, add to your diet, or eliminate from your diet.  Once you know what you’re willing to do and what results in will likely yield you can negotiate with yourself to find a good starting point.

And remember no change, or improvement, or addition, or elimination has to be 100% of the time.  Instead of 5 caramel macchiatos per week, go for 3.  And leave the rest of your diet and exercise regimen exactly the same.  You will be consuming less calories and you will lose weight.  It will be slow but it will be happen if you have patience.

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Once you know what your goals are and you truly believe you’re onboard with doing the things you need to do to get there, DO THEM.  And while you’re at it, do these things too:

  1. Be patient and kind with yourself. Lifestyle and dietary changes can be difficult.  Don’t beat yourself up for the ups and downs you will experience.  They are part of the journey. You’re not going to be your most healthy and fit self every season in your life.
  2. Focus on one thing at a time. When you make one small change it will make you feel good.  And that good feeling will ignite you to make another small change.  And so and so forth.
  3. Take your time. It’s not a race and it’s certainly not a competition.  It doesn’t matter if it takes you 6 weeks, 6 months or 6 years to get to where you want to be. Go at your own pace.

I would absolutely love to hear feedback on this topic because it is so so soooo important to me.  What’s your food philosophy?   😉

Be a Goal Getter!!!

It’s the new year and I don’t know about you, but I’m pretty excited for 2019.  I think it’s going to be a great year!  And the cool thing about that is I have COMPLETE CONTROL over making sure that happens.  I know it’s almost two weeks into January so I’m kinda late to the whole “goal setting, vision board, resolution” party but better late than never, right?

But I actually think it’s a good thing that I waited until now to post this.  We’re 10 days into the new year and I’m sure some of you have had moments of “I’m giving up” or “that’s too hard, what was I thinking?!” or “yeah, 2019 isn’t going to be my year.”   BUT, I beg of you not to throw in the towel yet.  First of all, you do not have to wait until January 1 or Monday to start new habits.  But if you decided that January 1 was your time, awesome.  If you decide it’s tomorrow, you go girl!

I don’t have an advanced degree in goal setting (haha), nor do I consider myself an expert.  But I do have to say that I’m pretty good at getting things done when I say I’m going to do them.  Not 100% of the time.  Not even 90% of the time.  But my track record of committing to things and achieving goals is at the very least decent.  Most of the things I’ve learned about goal setting, planning, etc. came from trial and error.  Other tidbits come from podcasts I’ve listened to or books I’ve read.  And of course, I learn from talking to others about what they do that works/doesn’t work for them.

Here are four things I personally do when I’m setting goals (and I encourage you to try them too!):

1. Write ’em down. Come on, people!  This is the easiest one!  The first step is coming up with the goal in your head.  The second is WRITING IT DOWN.  And so many people never even get there!  And be specific when you write down your goal!  Don’t be vague- “I want to eat healthier.”  What does that actually mean?!  Start off with a broad statement like that, but then drill down to what you actually want to accomplish.  For instance, “I want to eat healthier” turns into:

“I want to incorporate more greens into my diet by making sure I have at least 2 servings of greens 6 out of 7 days of the week.  My greens will include kale, spinach, broccoli, green beans, asparagus, and brussel sprouts.”

Writing down concrete, specific goals is going to increase the chances that you’ll stick with the goal.  How do I know this? I don’t know, it sounds obvious and it works for me.  Few more examples, shall we?

“I want to eat healthier” vs. “I am going to bring my lunch to work 4/5 days of the week.  That lunch will include a lean protein, a whole grain, and vegetables.”
“I want to get fit.” vs. “I am going to sign up for a membership to XYZ gym and go 4 days/week. I will do 20 minutes of cardio and 30 minutes of weight training most days.”
“I want to be better with money.” vs. “I set a reminder in my calendar for the 30th of each month. At that time if I have excess funds left in my bank account I am going put half of it towards my credit card debt/student loan and the other half in my savings account.”
“I want to have a better relationship with my mom/dad/brother/sister” vs. “I am going to call my dad twice a week so we can catch up more often.”

 

2. Don’t make goals for the sake of making goals. I know the new year is a good opportunity to jump on the “I’m going to get healthy/get fit/lose weight” bandwagon, but if you’re not truly committed to reaching a goal, don’t bother.  And I don’t say that to sound like a jerk, I’m saying it because it might just not be your time to tackle that goal (whatever it is).  Work on the things that are important to you now. And if those things change in 6 days, 6 weeks or 6 months from now, that’s fine.  Plus, when you don’t achieve that goal that you weren’t actually committed to, you feel like a failure.  And there’s just no need for that because you’re probably doing a million other things simultaneously and kicking butt at them.  And you’re also never a failure.  Just do you, girl.  DO YOU when the time is right FOR YOU!

3. Set obnoxiously large goals. This is another cute little trick I learned over the years that I am putting my own cute little spin on.  There’s what I call achievable goals and reach goals.  Achievable goals are goals that are, duh, achievable!  Meaning, you know you can do it.  So whether it’s saying I’m going to run 3 races this year (when your ran 2 last year) or I’m going to increase my sales by 5%, these are goals that achievable… or very, very modest goals.

Reach goals are exactly what they sound like too!  They are going to require you to plan the work and work the plan.  They are going to be extremely tough to accomplish.  But that’s the point.  Setting goals that are achievable is basically giving yourself a break.  But setting reeeeaaach goals is like pushing yourself to 95% of your fastest pace.  And even if you only get to 80%, or 85%, or 90%, it’s still way more than your achievable goal that only brought you to about 50% of your fastest pace.  You have to PUSH YOURSELF!

Personal example… last year I ran 0 races, completed 1 Beachbody program and averaged about 10 classes per month at pure barre.  A little weak for me.  This year’s goals?!  Eeek, I’m nervous at the thought of them, but here goes:

  1. Run 1 5K
  2. Run 1 10k or 15k
  3. Run 1 ½ Marathon
  4. Run a Spartan Race
  5. Take 15 classes/month at pure barre
  6. Complete Transform20 (Beachbody program)
  7. Do a MF pull-up

That’s a shit ton of stuff… like for real.  How did I come up with these 7 things?  I figured out what I can pretty easily do (my achievable goal) and wrote it down.  And then thought about what I reeeaallly want to accomplish and wrote it down.  Unless something crazy happens, I can guarantee that I’ll do more than my achievable goal.  I might not do my reach goal… but damn!, it would still be amazing if I did 5 or 6 of those things, right?

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4. Don’t take on too much at once. That sounds like a load of bull when I just listed 7 things I want to accomplish (and those are just my fitness goals).  But hear me out.  Those 7 goals are not going to be worked on simultaneously.  For example, I’m not even thinking about the ½ marathon yet.  That’s not something I’m doing until the fall most likely.  Right now I’m focused on making sure I get my 15 classes in at pure barre, adding in one more day of running, and starting Transform20 next week.

I’m not saying you can’t work on doing a two or three things at the same time… I’m just saying you can’t expect yourself to put 110% effort into 6 or 7 different things.  There’s not enough time in the day or pre-workout (or coffee for you normal folk) in the world to do that.  Just focus on the highest priorities RIGHT NOW and move on, or take on more, when you’re ready.

I hope you found this to be helpful and apply some of these principals when you are setting your goals.  Remember: be specific, write them down, only commit to what is really important, go for the gusto and don’t overload yourself.

#getitgirl

Wow, it’s been a while.  At least a month.  Part of the reason I have been hesitant to write has been because I wanted to write and share this particular post before I moved on.  This has been a huge year of personal growth for me.  The way it started and the way it ended couldn’t be any more different.  And while it was the hardest year of my life in a lot of ways, it was actually the best year in a lot of ways too.

I don’t really even know how to start this so I guess I’ll start with something simple:  my husband and I are getting divorced.  And before you start with the “I’m so sorry” spiel, know this:  It’s OK.  We’re OK.  The kids are OK.  The reason I’m sharing this is because it’s part of my journey.  My family life journey, my personal growth journey and even my fitness journey.  And like I said in my very first blog post, I think it’s important to share the hard things.  Especially since social media allows us to share the parts of our lives that we’re happy of, proud of, excited about, etc.  We hide all the things we don’t want people to see or know about us.  Even I do that at times.

I’m not going to go into details about what happened between me and Randy because there are things that in spite of caring about us or knowing us, only he and I will understand.  But I do want to provide some context.  Randy and I met when I was in 9th grade and he was in 12th grade.  I was 15 years old at the time… so you do the math, he’s been in my life longer than he hasn’t been.  We didn’t start dating until a few years later when I was 19 and he was 22.  And the people we were at 19 and 22 are very different than the people we are today.  The things that were important to both of us in relationships back when we were “kids” are different than today as “adults.”

But one of the things I think Randy and I have always had in common is the fact that we both have/had a lot of traditional values.  We were both brought up thinking that you meet someone, get engaged, buy a home, get married, start your family and DUH, live happily ever after…

I can only speak for myself here but I had a hard time coming to terms that Randy and I weren’t meant to be married anymore.  It was a hard pill to swallow after doing everything the “right” way.  I have always been that person—the one who does the right thing, follows the rules, makes logical and smart decisions.  I want people to like me.  And I absolutely hate disappointing people—especially my parents.

But you wanna know a secret?  I actually like coloring outside the lines once in a while.  I like to dance with danger just a bit.  And I’m a very emotional person that is perfectly OK with making gut decisions because at one point it was what I wanted.  And for the first time in my entire life, I don’t have a plan.  Or at least a 100% clear vision of what my future is going to look like.  And I’m learning to be OK with that.

So what does this all mean?  It means that while I still don’t like to disappoint people and I of course, want people to like me, I need to be true to myself.  Instead of being a shell of who I am, I need to embrace every part of who I am.  Even the part that makes dumb decisions, flies off the handle at stupid things, and is OK with people judging me when I do edgy things.  (Edgy by Lauren standards here. I’m not about to rob a bank 😉 ).

Ever since Randy and I separated back in March I feel more myself.  And it’s not because I ever felt that Randy held me back.  In fact, Randy has always supported me and encouraged me in everything I do.  I think it was the weight of the situation that snowballed to the point where I didn’t even know who I was or what I wanted anymore.  But since we separated, I feel more relaxed.  I feel more at ease with who I am and where I’m going (wherever the F that is).  And I came to the conclusion that I rather be unapologetically me, than someone who tries to be something or someone for everyone else.

But I’ll be 1000000% honest.  There are days that are hard.  There are days that I cry A LOT.  There are days that I question decisions made 2 years ago and 2 minutes ago.  But just like everyone else who’s going through “stuff”, I just keep on chugging along.  Because just like everyone else, I have to.  Because the world doesn’t stop if I’m having a bad day.  Life continues.  My kids still need me to be their mommy.  My job needs to me to function.  And my house won’t be able to run if I don’t do the laundry, pay the bills or go food shopping.

And quite frankly, I feel incredibly lucky.  Why?  Because me and Randy are still friends.  And maybe that’s always been part of the problem- we’ve been really good friends for so long.  But either way, we care about each other and respect each other enough to make what we’re going through right now the healthiest it can possibly be.  Maybe it’s weird to outsiders. Maybe it’s not “normal.”  But it works for us. Don’t’ get me wrong, we still piss each other off.  But I’m pretty sure that comes with any relationship—whether it’s a married couple, divorced couple or just a plain ol’ besties since 4th grade.  We all get into arguments and push each other’s buttons at times.

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So how does this tie into what I’m doing with my fitness blog?  Well, I’ll tell you.  Being a “health, fitness, move your body, work your mind, live your best life self” advocate is something I love to do.  And I’ve thrown myself into it even more so lately because I am truly passionate about it.  I love sharing what lights me up inside.  It’s also the most normal and consistent thing in my life.  In a year where things got flipped upside down, I was able to keep some sort of normalcy by keeping up with my fitness routine.  It’s kept me sane.

It also gives me:

an opportunity to reflect.

an opportunity to push my physical limits and see what my body is capable of.

an opportunity to sweat out the stress.

an opportunity to gain confidence.

an opportunity release endorphins

an opportunity to start my day off on the right foot

an opportunity to continue to work on myself at a time where I could easily just throw in the towel and say, “I’ll restart when things calm down.”

an opportunity to prove to myself that I can handle ANYTHING.

So I’ll leave you with this—do whatever the hard thing is.  Work on the hard things.  Make peace with the hard things.  Just don’t let the hard things hold you back.  Because at the end of the day, that is a much more regrettable way to live your life.

And one more thing—only YOU know what feels right to you.  So don’t ever let anyone tell you otherwise.

And lastly, when in doubt, sweat it out!  😉 Believe me, it helps in more ways than you’ll ever know. Even though your problems still exist after your workout is over, you have the chance to clear your head and more importantly, time to work on yourself. And at a time when I’ve needed it the most, working out reminds me that I am strong enough to push through anything that comes my way.

So with that, see ya later 2018!  And hello there, 2019!  🙂